Art In America

The Agenda: This Week in New York

A.i.A. editors suggest a few of the myriad events taking place in New York this weekend: a reading of a new dictionary by Women Inc.; a poetry reading in conjunction with a Robert Barry exhibition; a discussion on post-Internet art process with Harm van den Dorpel; an encounter between Yuri Masnyj's installation and Lauren Bakst's performance at Pioneer Works; and an evening with writer Renata Adler....Read more

Previews

Five Points With Simone Subal

When you enter Florian Meisenberg's exhibition at Simone Subal Gallery (through Apr. 12) on the Lower East Side, you might feel a bit disoriented. The show's title accentuates that sensation: "Delivery to the following recipients failed permanently." "E…Read more

News

Art + Practice Pairs Art with Social Change in Los Angeles

Art + Practice is a nonprofit founded by artist Mark Bradford, collector and philanthropist Eileen Harris Norton, and activist Allan DiCastro. Its mission is unique and multipronged, with a stated mandate to promote contemporary art and provide service…Read more

Previews

The Agenda: This Week in Los Angeles

A.i.A. editors suggest a few of the myriad events taking place this week in Los Angeles: an evening with Ralph Bakshi at USC; a screening of new Jeepneys' films at the Echo Park Film Center; a performance of Ann Hirsch's play Playground at Joan; and a …Read more

Previews

The Agenda: This Week in New York

A.i.A. editors suggest a few of the myriad events taking place in New York this week: Richard Maxwell's new play at the Kitchen; a lecture with photographer Carrie Mae Weems at NYU Steinhardt; BAMcinématek's "New Voices in Black Cinema" series; a night…Read more

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News

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s Detroit Year Explored in DIA Show

Just over four months after the Detroit Institute of Arts was officially rescued from the threat of liquidation due to citywide bankruptcy, the museum opened a show of works by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. This first major exhibition since the settlem…Read more

News

A Perfectly Basel Hong Kong

"Same Old, Brand New" read Chinese artist Cao Fei's projection on Hong Kong's 1,600-foot International Commerce Centre last Saturday evening. Capping the second preview day of the 2015 Art Basel Hong Kong fair (Mar. 15-17), the spectacle deftly reflect…Read more

Previews

Five Points With Bob Nickas

The first show Bob Nickas ever curated was titled "Hunger for Words," a play on the German critic Wolfgang Max Faust's Hunger for Pictures, a survey of contemporary German painting. Since then Nickas has organized over 80 exhibitions.…Read more

Ann Agee at P.P.O.W
  • “Work Hard: Selections by Valentin Carron” at Swiss Institute

  • Alice Neel at David Zwirner

  • Alisa Baremboym at 47 Canal

The Lookout

A Weekly Guide to Shows You Won’t Want to Miss

This week This week we've got our eye on Ann Agee at P.P.O.W, a Swiss Institute group show curated by Valentin Carron, Alisa Baremboym at 47 Canal, Jan Groover at Janet Borden, and Alice Neel's portraits at David Zwirner.…Read more

Reviews

 

Ann Cathrin November Høibo, an idiosyncratic and refreshingly eccentric young Norwegian, is garnering international attention for her offbeat sculptures and paintings utilizing weaving, fabric, dangling string and cords, rubber bands, various found objects and spare, intense color. Høibo’s austere, yet curiously lush, exhibition “Informers,” at the adventurous, artist-run SIC, showcased how her extremely material art is suffused with ineffable feeling, with a visual poetry that you can’t really place but instead accept and absorb. 

Høibo’s background is in weaving, but she is by no means a textile artist per se. One of the show's multiple pieces designated Untitled (informers)—all works 2014—is a handwoven tapestry of primarily beige wool hung from a horizontal white bar on the wall....Read more

 

The human is not a fact derived from biology, but a cultural category whose boundaries and definitions are constantly being reworked or violently maintained. Recent protests against police brutality in the United States have highlighted how racial categories operate as vectors through which entitlements to social benefits and even life flow. Processes of racialization mark the boundaries of what is taken for human, and are a terrain of struggle. 

Oliver Laric’s show did not explicitly engage with these politics, but seemed haunted by their foundational questions. A long essay by philosopher Rosi Braidotti, which functioned as something halfway between a press release and an artwork, ends by praising Laric for his consideration of “nomadic becoming,” but notes at the outset that able-bodied straight white masculinity, like Laric’s,...Read more

 

Kochi, located in the state of Kerala near an area once occupied by the ancient port of Muziris, has a layered history. Before being ruled successively by the Portuguese, Dutch and British, it was settled by Jews and Syrian Christians, and visited by Moorish and Chinese traders. Consequently, although the place is seductively balmy, it’s a little disconcerting that “Whorled Explorations,” the second edition of India’s premier international art exhibition, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, should take a cruise line approach to the past.

Under the direction of artist Jitish Kallat (b. 1974), the event brings together some 90 individual artists and groups, nearly half from India and the rest from 29 other countries. The works, many of them commissioned, are shown in eight venues, primarily in the seaside neighborhood of Fort Kochi. In his curat...Read more

 

Literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin’s definition of carnival as a “syncretic pageantry of a ritualistic sort,” where traditional values are overturned, sacred and profane blended, and a sacrilegious attitude encouraged, seems to fit the work of British artist Marvin Gaye Chetwynd. After her nomination for the Turner Prize in 2012 (when she was known as Spartacus Chetwynd; she has since changed her name), the artist gained wide recognition for her kaleidoscopic performances. Combining dance, theater and improvisation, these works capsize social conventions in favor of a carnivalesque spirit. 

For her second solo exhibition at Massimo De Carlo, Chetwynd created a typically colorful and exuberant atmosphere. The gallery’s ground level featured an installation consisting of papier-mâché props (small-scale versions of a spac...Read more

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