Art In America

Arlene Shechet

at Frick Collection,
1 East 70th Street

Arlene Shechet’s earthly interventions into 130 pieces produced by the Royal Meissen manufactory from the renowned Arnhold Collection brilliantly and imaginatively update a venerable collection without cheapening either tradition or the new.  Shechet, who made the ten sculptures included among the Meissen originals during a residencies at the manufactory, energizes and synchronizes the rational eighteenth century and the multimedia, multifaceted present. Her Dancing Girl with Two Right Feet (2012) is an absurd object. The dancer’s two white legs and red feet stick out from a tutu in an ungainly pose, as confounding as a Degas figure awkwardly emerging from a tub.  It helps highlight the ridiculous charm of Meissen’s Cruet and Mustard Pot (1737–39), with two flirty women perched on roosters. Shechet’s works twist porcelain in unexpected directions, inverting ideas about how objects should appear and perform.  —Barbara MacAdam

 

Pictured: Arlene Shechet: Dancing Girl with Two Right Feet, 2012, Meissen porcelain with gold, 10⅝ inches. © Arlene Shechet. Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Photo Jason Wyche.

More from the Lookout

“Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center”

at the Isamu Noguchi Museum,
through Jan. 7
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City

Submit your e-mail to receive insider information from the art world every week.