Lygia Clark

Lygia Clark’s first show at Luhring Augustine—which earlier this year announced co-representation of the late Brazilian artist with London’s Alison Jacques Gallery—is a coda of sorts to her sprawling retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in summer 2014. Titled “Modulated Space,” it includes dozens of abstract, geometric drawings from the late 1950s that exist in tandem with her movable metal sculptures known at “Bichos” (“critters” in Portuguese). In the gallery’s back room is a low vitrine filled with delicate paper and wood maquettes. Clark intended for her “Bichos” to be folded and manipulated, turning early exhibitions into quasi performances or events. Here, several large metal pieces are installed on circular white-foam platforms resting on metal bases. No touching allowed. —Leigh Anne Miller

 

Pictured: Lygia Clark: Study for Bicho, 1960, balsa wood, adhesive tape, and graphite, 8 by 8 inches. © O Mundo de Lygia Clark-Associação Cultural, Rio de Janeiro. Courtesy Luhring Augustine, New York and Alison Jacques Gallery, London.

Lygia Clark

This retrospective for the pioneering Brazilian artist, “Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948-1988” contains some 300 works. Featuring numerous examples of her well-known modular, interactive abstract sculptures in metal, the show also highlights the elegant early geometric paintings that were part of the Neo-Concretist movement in Brazil. Most importantly, the exhibition offers an in-depth examination of her performance-based works, which demonstrate why Clark (1920-1988) is currently regarded as one of the most influential figures of the international 20th-century avant-garde.