Nir Evron: A Free Moment, 2011, 35mm film transferred to HD video, 4 minutes; in the ICP Triennial.

The first three ICP triennials were given titles that imparted their organizing themes: "Strangers," in 2003, considered street photography and images of people unknown to us; "Ecotopia," in 2007, was about environmental change; and "Dress Codes," in 2010, examined fashion's role in our lives. The title of this triennial, "A Different Kind of Order," which includes 28 international artists (only eight of whom are women), brings to the fore the wholesale shifts that have upended photography during the 10-year span since the 2003 exhibition. What had been subtext is now the central focus, and there are nearly as many moving-image works as still photographs. The primary medium of several artists is not even lens-based.

No single theme emerges, despite the curators' insistence that the apparent chaos of our moment is the titular "new kind of order." What patterns the four curators discern feel kaleidoscopic, liable to sudden shifts, rather than stable and self-evident. Keywords defined in the catalogue's introduction—"Analog," "Collage," "Community," "Self-Publishing"—are hashtags as much as principles, and suitable for our transitional moment.

Viewers could trace their own through lines; I was repeatedly struck by the sense of accumulation translated by the artworks, and by the ways lenses are being used to capture and represent bodies under duress. The acquisitive impulse was manifested simply, as in Roy Arden's rather dull Quicktime slideshow of thousands of images he has gathered from the Internet, and in the selection of photographs from Michael Schmelling's project The Plan (2009), which documents the efforts of Disaster Masters, a New York company that counsels hoarders. The emphasis on bodies in particular places at particular times is expressed with haunting clarity in London-based South African photographer Gideon Mendel's photographs and video from his project Drowning World (2007-). What would have been full-length frontal portraits of flood victims in such places as Nigeria and Thailand are, sadly, converted into three-quarter or half-length portraits by the brackish waters that have risen up to their subjects' knees, waist or chest. The seven-minute video of people trying to go about their daily lives in these conditions is particularly poignant.

These two themes converge in some of the strongest contributions to the exhibition: Jim Goldberg's Proof (2011), an affecting wall-length installation of contact prints depicting undocumented immigrants, and Thomas Hirschhorn's Touching Reality (2012), a wall-size projected video of a woman's hand swiping an iPad to scroll through images of bodies torn asunder by violence. The intimacy of the hand's gesture is contradicted by the distancing effect of the iPad's screen (and that of the projection). It offers unvarnished proof of just how vulnerable our bodies are, while also reminding viewers that privilege—and our mass media—largely spare us the evidence of bodily harm.

If the exhibition felt like a grab bag, it nonetheless was stuffed with engaging works. Every inclusion that seemed weak or out of place—Huma Bhabha, Mishka Henner, Sohei Nishino, Elliott Hundley—was offset by revelations. The Israeli artist Nir Evron's film A Free Moment (2011), presented here as a wall-size high-definition video projection, is at once rigorously structured and disorientingly unstable. Evron installed a dolly track inside the unfinished summer palace in Jerusalem begun in the 1960s by King Hussein of Jordan. The film begins with a commanding view over the city; the camera then pulls back along the track into the concrete shell of the building and begins rotating and panning in a 360-degree circle. Ground and sky are confused; detailed views of the concrete ceiling look like the surface of the moon; the film's apparatus—the track, the camera—at times edge into the frame. Reminiscent of work by the Canadian artist Mark Lewis, A Free Moment is compulsively watchable. In its balance between order and disorder, Evron's film is an elegant microcosm of the exhibition's concerns.