Art In America

This Land Is Your Land: Earthworks on YouTube

As A.i.A. senior editor William S. Smith pointed out in his essay on Michael Heizer (whose 1970 installation Actual Size: Munich Rotary is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through April 10) our April issue, “Land art was photogenic out of...

Critics and Dreamers

In the world according to Dave Hickey, everyone is either a Pirate (a plundering, boundary-defying individualist) or a Farmer (a fence-building nurturer).

Banksy’s New York Residency: Experts Weigh In

"Banksy's street pieces have an ephemerality that tugs its forelock to Conceptual art in that it goes away," Hickey told A.i.A. when reached by phone. "But I know about a thousand better taggers whose work lasts about as long as Banksy's does."

Timeline: 100 Years of Art in America

Over the past century, Art in America has developed from a small specialized journal to a major voice in the rapidly changing contemporary art world. To celebrate the magazine's 100-year anniversary, we look back at the milestones that helped define...

The Last Testament of Ken Price

The West Coast artist spent a lifetime making bold, cunning art in the often disparaged medium of ceramics—and inspiring others to do likewise.

Mark Flood

During the 1980s, Houston-based Mark Flood worked in relative obscurity, creating violent and frequently pornographic artworks which express an antipathy toward commercial culture that is perhaps best summed up by the name he gave his experimental...

Land Art for the Media Age

A current museum survey of Land art challenges the established definition of the 1960s and '70s movement. In March of 1962, Jean Tinguely arrived in Las Vegas to construct a massive auto-destructive sculpture. Study for an End of the World, No. 2,...

Artist and Teacher Karl Benjamin Has Died

Karl Benjamin, the painter known for his brilliantly colored geometric works, died July 26. He was 86. In the exhibition catalog from Louis Stern Fine Arts's 2007 survey of Benjamin's work, art critic Dave Hickey wrote, "I can think of no other ...

More Than Lace: Mark Flood at Luxembourg & Dayan

Texas artist Mark Flood may be best known for his lace paintings from the early 2000s, the large, multi-hued acrylic pieces that use torn fabric to illusionistic ends. But his expansive retrospective, "The Hateful Years," at Luxembourg and Dayan...

Today's LA Look: Q+A With Irving Blum

Los Angeles has long been gearing up for "Art in the Streets," the exhibition of street and graffiti art that opened yesterday at LA MOCA, and the Getty's momentous initiative, "Pacific Standard Time," a survey of post-war California art, slated to...

Witnessing for Women

If there is one central conclusion to be drawn from the recent array of books and catalogues on contemporary women artists, it is that there exists no such thing as women’s art, or even feminist art. Indeed, as many feminist scholars, critics and...

Lives of the Artists and Let's See

During the third quarter of the 20th century, the New Yorker—characterized by intellectual assurance, cultural breadth and refreshing clarity—played a central role in defining late modern taste. Affiliated writers such as Whitney Balliett, Arlene...

Conceptualizing Craft

Books on theory are rarely urgent reading foranyone but other theorists. The exception iswhen the field they cover happens to be in crisis.Then they are voraciously consumed in a search fora solution to whatever ails the field. For that reason, two...

From the Archives: Poetics of the Drain

On the occasion of Robert Gober's retrospective at New York's Museum of Modern Art, A.i.A. delved into the archives. In our December 1997 issue, art historian David Joselit argued that Gober's invocation of Duchamp was even more sly than often...

From the Archives: Ed Ruscha, Geographer

The cover of our June/July 2016 issue features a text work by Ed Ruscha. We looked back to our October 1982 issue, in which Carrie Rickey wrote on the artist's traveling retrospective organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She desribes...

From the Archives: Earthscapes, landworks and Oz

Dave Hickey tackled Land art with characteristic vigor in an essay for A.i.A.'s September-October 1971 issue. With occasional detours into country music and The Wizard of Oz, he speculated on what seeing Land art as a new form of landscape, and on...

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