Art In America

Inside the Art Bars

Bars have been as essential to the New York art world as its galleries and museums. Eleven artists reflect on the downtown institutions where creative inspiration could flow as freely as the drinks.  

Timeline: 100 Years of Art in America

Over the past century, Art in America has developed from a small specialized journal to a major voice in the rapidly changing contemporary art world. To celebrate the magazine's 100-year anniversary, we look back at the milestones that helped define...

High Style, Clear Form, Sharp Edge

Embracing myriad forms of experimental art and criticism in the 1970s and ’80s, Scott Burton brought a precise yet idiosyncratic intelligence to every project he undertook.

Neo-Expressionism Not Remembered

In the early 1980s, Art in America hosted a debate on emerging Neo-Expressionist art. Now, after three contentious decades, history seems to have declared a winner. But don’t be too sure.

Joyce Pensato Wins Robert De Niro, Sr. Award

The winner was selected by a jury of distinguished members of the art world, including A.i.A.'s editor-at-large and former editor-in-chief, Elizabeth C. Baker; Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles founder Douglas Cramer; and Robert Storr, dean of...

The Lookout: A Weekly Guide to Shows You Won't Want to Miss

This week we check out Steve Currie's understated tour-de-force exhibition of wire sculptures at Elizabeth Harris, Rachel Harrison's painted-cement pieces, augmented with the occasional cleaning product, at Greene Naftali, and Kristin Baker's...

Franz Gertsch

A Swiss painter who came to prominence in the early 1970s in Europe, where he is better known than in the U.S., Franz Gertsch is the subject of the exhibition "The Seasons." Four expansive canvases depict a patch of sloping woodland near his house...

Keith Sonnier

For his most recent New York exhibition, Keith Sonnier presented nine sculptures, three collages and five drawings, all from the second half of the 1960s, made before he began to work intensively with neon. The show was titled “Files”; several of...

Ivan Navarro

Ivan Navarro (born 1972 in Chile) is known internationally for his sculptures in electric light. Prominent among them are his witty versions of Marcel Breuer chairs and coffee tables, built from bright-hued fluorescent tubes, their straight lines...

Lawler, Wearing Put Women on Top at Gallery Week

An ambitious exhibition that opened Friday night in Harris Lieberman's cavernous temporary space at 508 W. 26th Street in Chelsea is titled, in a pointedly innocuous way, "A Painting Show." Works by 35 artists hang cheek by jowl, and though nothing...

Scott Burton

Burton returned to the chair repeatedly, in his public sculpture (examples can be seen around Manhattan and elsewhere by those who know where to look) and in permutations intended for private use. It's clear that he considered the chair a...

And the AICA Awards Go To...

Their awards may not have the glitz of Rob Pruitt's Art Awards, but the U.S. chapter of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA) has stamina. It has presented annual prizes for over 25 years, and just announced the 2010 winners. While...

June Leaf

Reprising Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper in a series of reliefs cut from sheets of tin, along with studies on canvas and on paper, June Leaf undertakes a gutsy, idiosyncratic venture into well-trodden territory.

Jill Johnston in Art in America

Cultural critic, feminist theorist, memoirist and A.i.A. contributor Jill Johnston died on Nov. 18 at age 81. The feature "Tehching Hsieh: Art's Willing Captive" [September 2001, pp. 140–143] is one of many essays she wrote on a wide range of...

Adrian Paci

Adrian Paci's concise exhibition, "Motion Picture(s)," which consisted of several videos and one big painting/construction, provided a good look at various aspects of his work over the past decade. Paci was born in 1969 in Shkoder, Albania, and...

Kazuo Shiraga

Six large, paint-laden gestural abstractions made a ferociously muscular appearance in New York recently, constituting, along with photos and films, a compact account of a leading participant in Japan’s postwar avant-garde.

John Gerrard

In a pair of solo appearances, his first in New York, John Gerrard showed three visually stunning, thematically related digital works (all 2008).

Surrealism To Die For

Many avant-garde artists believed that free imaginings, even at their most gruesome, would help render people unsuitable for social or commercial bondage.

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