Art In America

From the Archives: Transmodern Yoko

In A.i.A.'s February 2002 Issue, critic J.W. Mahoney delved into Yoko Ono's evasion of artistic categories through the lens of the works selected for her touring retrospective, "Yes Yoko Ono."

“No Vacancies”

Lisa Williamson is at least 40 years younger than the other artists in the atmospheric group show "No Vacancies," but her sculptures and collages don't appear out of sync. The Los Angeles-based artist, born in 1977, is represented by three white...

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

Iranian artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, better known simply as Monir, has long believed in the transcendental possibilities of mirrors.

The Breuer Effect

In 1966, A.i.A. devoted four articles in its September-October issue to the then-new Whitney Museum designed by Marcel Breuer. Architectural historian Timothy M. Rohan discusses the views of our writers, who characterized the massive building as a...

John Armleder

Inappropriately enough, in the 1980s, John Armleder was briefly associated with the Neo-Geo movement. The geometric idiom in painting is chiefly a means of closing down the arbitrariness of subjective decision-making, whereas Armleder has always been...

Alma Thomas

Though she was the first African-American woman to receive a solo exhibition at an American museum—at the Whitney, in 1972—the abstract painter Alma Thomas (1891-1978) is underknown today. "Moving Heaven & Earth," her second solo show at Rosenfeld,...

Memphis Group

Faces break into smiles encountering the far-out furniture of the Memphis Group, the Italian design collective officially active between 1981 and 1986. 

Blackness in Abstraction

Through the art of Adam Pendleton, the author argues for an open-ended space in which the terms of historical Conceptualism have shifted.  

From the Archives: Lee Krasner on Protest and Pollock

On the occasion of the exhibition "From the Margins: Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis, 1945-1952," at New York's Jewish Museum (through Feb. 1, 2015), A.i.A. delved into the archives. For our September-October 1977 issue, we explored the question "What...

Outsider Art Fair Announces 2015 List, Changes Dates Again

At press time 38 galleries from 23 international cities have signed on; the organizers expect a few more to join in the coming weeks, bringing the total closer to last year's 47. Booth prices range from $6,500 to $15,000, with smaller spaces also...

A Private Passion Goes Public: Stanford’s Anderson Collection

Stanford University, a hub of innovative entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and the origin of the "sharing economy" (think Uber and Airbnb), is now home to a magnificent example of art sharing. The Anderson Collection, a new museum that is part of...

Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby's exhibition at Hauser and Wirth's cavernous downtown gallery was a stunning display of sculpture and painting that challenged viewers with aggressive scale, colors and textures. 

Ned Vena

Usually, where contemporary U.S. painting is still in thrall to its great flowering of the 1950s and '60s, its allusions are ironic or critical qualifications of an earlier ideal of direct, painterly expression.

Shedding New Light on Modernist Painter Rudolf Bauer

Singled out as a star by no less than museum namesake Solomon Guggenheim in the 1930s, German abstract painter Rudolf Bauer (1889-1953) has receded considerably from public view, especially compared to his contemporaries like Wassily Kandinsky and...

Warhol, Lawrence and Diebenkorn Troves to Cantor Arts Center

Stanford University's Cantor Arts Center has received large gifts of works by Richard Diebenkorn, Jacob Lawrence and Andy Warhol. The donation comprises 26 sketchbooks containing approximately 1,300 Diebenkorn drawings, 26 works by Lawrence in...

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