Art In America

Philip Guston

How many artists working today haven’t looked to Philip Guston (1913–1980) for inspiration? Late in his career, the consummate Abstract Expressionist abandoned abstraction for figuration (which he had engaged with early on, employed by the WPA), the...

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun

Some historians trace the role of the politically active artist to French Revolution-era painter Jacques-Louis David, a turbulent figure who signed the death warrants of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. But there are different kinds of...

This Land Is Your Land: Earthworks on YouTube

As A.i.A. senior editor William S. Smith pointed out in his essay on Michael Heizer (whose 1970 installation Actual Size: Munich Rotary is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through April 10) our April issue, “Land art was photogenic out of...

Keiichi Tanaami

Over his eighty years, Tokyo-born Keiichi Tanaami has had many careers: he worked in advertising during the postwar period, discovered the Pop scene and met Andy Warhol in his Factory in the 1960s, and served as an editor of the Japanese edition of...

Hernan Bas

The apathetic young men in Hernan Bas’s enchanting recent paintings in “Bright Young Things” could be the same figures cavorting on the Rich Kids of Instagram page, wealthy socialite types not shy about their lavish lifestyles. The acrylic and pastel...

Tauba Auerbach

One recent afternoon I stood dumbly looking down at a low blue table laden with 3-D-printed objects fastidiously arranged by Tauba Auerbach. Black, white and gold forms might have been machine parts, but they seemed largely decorative. The tableau,...

Emma Amos

This exhibition of Emma Amos’s paintings from the 1980s, which explore the representation of black bodies and painting modes traditionally embraced by white male artists, strike a contemporary cord. In her “Athletes and Animals” series (1983-85),...

Misha Kahn

The bleak journey to Misha Kahn’s “Return of Saturn: Coming of Age in the 21st Century” actually heightens the experience of entering the exhibition. Descend the staircase to Friedman Benda’s basement-level Project Space, pass the garbage bins and...

Anri Sala

It's fair to say that the thrill of a live symphony orchestra is often lost on—or ignored by—the general public. With so many other forms of entertainment competing for our attention, observing the effusion of a complex language of musical...

Hilary Harnischfeger

There is something duplicitous about licorice allsorts. The English sugar candies delight the eye with their fluorescent-colored stripes and dots, but can taste surprisingly medicinal. The pretty, treatlike sculptures in Hilary Harnischfeger's recent...

Tauba Auerbach

In 2010, Tauba Auerbach unveiled the Auerglass, a two-person pump organ that only plays when both musicians engage the foot pedals. The formal concerns of the technologically sophisticated-looking 3-D-printed objects, glass sculptures, acrylic and...

Robert Berlind (1938-2015)

Painter and longtime Art in America contributor Robert Berlind died on December 17, 2015. He was 77. Throughout his 50-year career, Berlind produced an expansive body of work, mostly landscapes rooted in observation and memory.

Best of London, 2015

Ralph Rugoff is director of the Hayward Gallery in London. He recently curated the 13th Lyon Biennale, on view through Jan. 3, and is currently organizing a group show featuring video work that centers on the idea of performance, which will open at...

Julia Bland

In a 1986 essay, Jean-Hubert Martin, the future curator of the Centre Pompidou’s “Magiciens de la Terre,” complained that “too much art today is given over to intensive production that obscures any spiritual value.” Julia Bland avoided this pitfall in...

Sew Your Own Stella

Frank Stella’s career retrospective, opening at the Whitney Museum this Friday, Oct. 30, showcases approximately 120 works, including paintings, reliefs, maquettes, sculptures and drawings, that the 79-year-old artist has produced over the last half...

Will Benedict

Titled “A Bone in the Cheese,” Will Benedict’s first solo show at Bortolami recalled Archibald MacLeish’s absurdist, apocalyptic sonnet about a circus in which an “armless ambidextrian” lights a match between his toes for an audience under the big...

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