Art In America

Dawn Clements

Classic still-life offerings like oranges and cherries mingle with modern personal effects such as Carmex lip balm and cancer medications in the works on paper in Dawn Clements’s “Tables and pills and things.” Using Sumi ink, ballpoint pens,...

Romare Bearden

The twenty-one intimately scaled collages that constitute Romare Bearden’s “Bayou Fever” (1979) are vibrant, chaotic, and humid. Bearden (1911–1988) invokes religious traditions of New Orleans and the Caribbean with a riot of beautiful, sinister jewel...

Elizabeth Jaeger

“The problem of woman,” André Breton wrote in 1929, “is the most marvelous and disturbing problem in all the world.” Elizabeth Jaeger’s ceramic and steel sculptures (all 2017) in “Pommel,” her second solo exhibition at Jack Hanley, confront the...

Georgia O’Keeffe

An icon of twentieth-century art, Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986) embodied her signature aesthetic in every aspect of her self-presentation. "Georgia O'Keeffe: Living Modern" presents paintings alongside photographic portraits, clothing, and other...

Eleanor Antin

From 1971 to 1973, the conceptual and performance artist Eleanor Antin traveled with one hundred pairs of black rubber rain boots from California to New York. Along the way, Antin carefully posed her footwear collection in rigid rows, capturing the...

Ray Hamilton

Self-taught artist Ray Hamilton (1919–1996) has been a darling of the downtown New York art world since Artists Space exhibited his drawings in 1991. Kerry Schuss has represented Hamilton since the mid-’90s, but the present show of his work is the...

TM Davy

Horses have appeared throughout the course of art history to a multitude of effects, from ceramic votives in ancient Chinese burial sites to European hunting and battle scenes. In recent memory, they have been coopted in popular culture by the ultra...

Robert Anton

Robert Anton (1949–84), a fantastically unique member of New York’s avant-garde theater scene of the 1970s, fabricated elaborate puppets and props for silent plays he enacted in miniature prosceniums. In addition to drawings, news clippings, letters,...

Miles Coolidge

Five large black-and-white photographs greet visitors to “Coal Seam redux,” Miles Coolidge’s first solo show at Peter Blum, immersing viewers in the shimmering, textured abyss of a coal mine. The large scale of the images conjures the mine’s crushing...

“Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America”

“Secure the shadow ere the substance fades,” one of the earliest slogans used by commercial photographers, refers to the light-catching nature of the medium but also to the Victorian-era practice of depicting corpses in lifelike poses. “Securing the...

Jonathan Gardner

Two nearly identical young women with bobbed red hair sit before a large standing mirror in a room carpeted in jungle green. One of them perches on a divan, holding a telephone away from her ear. Her white underwear peaks out from beneath a blue ombré...

Yvonne Jacquette

Yvonne Jacquette has literally taken to the skies to capture the dense aerial landscapes depicted in the thirty-one paintings included in this survey of the last thirty-five years of her career. Jacquette, who divides her time between New York and...

“Black Pulp!”

The desire to self-present is often a political one, a reaction against others’ feckless stereotypes. In “Black Pulp!,” curators William Villalongo and Mark Thomas Gibson, both artists, have assembled a remarkable collection of printed matter—much on...

Keegan Monaghan

The interminably nosy among us felt right at home in “You decide to take a walk,” Keegan Monaghan’s solo debut at On Stellar Rays. The show’s title work, the lone sculpture, stood in the center of the gallery surrounded by five paintings (all works...

Tschabalala Self

The eight new paintings in “Gut Feelings,” Tschabalala Self’s second solo exhibition at Thierry Goldberg Gallery, portray black women in compositions of acrylic paint, fabric, paper, and fragments of older canvases. Several of the collaged works are...

Kerry James Marshall

Some thirty years ago, Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955) decided to create paintings predominantly featuring black figures as a corrective to the white canon. Marshall stayed the course, and this traveling retrospective, which features eighty works...

Matthew Chambers

In his book On Fire (Paper Monument, 2016), Jonathan Griffin interviews ten unlucky artists whose studios burned down, asking what effects the disaster had on their practices. Los Angeles–based Matthew Chambers is one of Griffin’s subjects. He lost...

Peter Shire

Dozens of bright, asymmetrical sculptures by Los Angeles-based artist Peter Shire crowd three low white tables in “A Survey of Ceramics: 1970s to the Present” at Derek Eller, making a strong case for a revival of kitschy ’80s aesthetics. An original...

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