Art In America

Stanley Whitney

Stanley Whitney’s two recent shows of lyrical abstract paintings and drawings stepped with springy confidence into an art world where, for the last decade or so, abstraction has been increasingly visible. Whitney has been around New York’s art world...

Leon Golub

Leon Golub’s death in 2004, at the age of 82, coincided with the full flowering of the privatized guerrilla warfare that he caustically portrayed in his most celebrated paintings of the 1970s and ’80s. Mounted to coincide with a retrospective at...

Joan Snyder

Joan Snyder’s canvases—alternately gentle and tragic, pastoral and grimy—elicit thoughts of Susan Sontag’s half-century-old call for an “erotics of art.” The works’ emotional openness compels us to experience them directly through our feelings, rather...

Trenton Doyle Hancock

Trenton Doyle Hancock’s dizzying midcareer retrospective had the density of jokes, random asides and self-referentiality of a maximalist novel. Hancock treated the gallery the way his literary contemporaries (he’s a year older than Zadie Smith) treat...

Ann Agee

Though showing a disparate range of work has become common among young sculptors, Agee’s willingness to spiral out in so many directions, while making each piece compelling in itself, resulted in her exhibition’s main successes. 

Stanley Lewis

Clotted with paint, stapled or glued together in sections so that they are as patched and dog-eared as an old map, Stanley Lewis’s observational paintings and drawings depict the small-town middle-class world familiar to readers of John Updike’s...

John Walker

There aren’t many painters making abstractions as convincing as John Walker’s. 

Dona Nelson

Dona Nelson pushes her paintings hard. They're doused in thinned acrylics, splattered with gooey tar gel medium, festooned with wads and strips of cheesecloth (that are sometimes then ripped off) and, occasionally, stabbed with ice picks.

Sebastian Black

Sebastian Black's recent solo exhibition was both promising and disappointing. 

Rachel Farbiarz

Rachel Farbiarz's treatment of the subject matter in her first solo show—the trauma caused by war and other man-made and natural disasters—might have come off as preachy in the wrong hands.

Zachary Keeting

From a distance, the eight paintings in Zachary Keeting's recent show looked like collages; up close, they revealed themselves to be layered acrylics.

Philip Taaffe

What a difference seven years make. Political and economic circumstances altered radically between Philip Taaffe's last two solo shows in New York, and this may have something to do with why his recent outing was so much the better.

Becoming Adults: The Paintings of Elena Sisto

April is a big month for Sisto. She's having first New York solo show since 2004, the traveling exhibition "Between Silver Light and Orange Shadow," which originated at Miami Dade College Museum of Art + Design, made a stop at the University of...

Joan Semmel

Ever since relinquishing an Abstract Expressionist style in the early '70s, Joan Semmel has taken as her subject the nude-mostly herself, seen as if she is looking down at her own body. The new works at Gray are based on digital self-portrait...

Judith Linhares

Populated by female figures more nudist than nude, Judith Linhares's recent paintings have the clarity of a dream: the scenarios and moods are instantly readable, while nuanced meanings lie just beneath the surface. Cavorting in nature-sunbathing,...

Eleanor Moreton

Eleanor Moreton’s New York solo debut presented 10 small to medium-size reworkings (all 2010) of compositions by once-famous 19th-century painters, such as the Pre-Raphaelite John William Waterhouse and the Austrian realist Ferdinand Georg...

Marta Minujin

Dense with works made, remade and documented from a half-century career, this retrospective of Marta Minujín in her home city of Buenos Aires presented an artist whose appetite for all kinds of sensation—intellectual, esthetic and political—and for...

Rose Wylie

Grand and messy, Rose Wylie's big paintings, mostly about 6 feet tall and between 5 and 11 feet wide, depict simple motifs—a cat, a cartoonlike head, a hand holding a flashlight. Broad areas of loosely applied paint are cut into with doodlelike...

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