Art In America

Poems Without Words

With a 1975 series of stacked-line compositions, the painter David Reed began to garner recognition from critics and peers alike. Now those legendary works from his first solo exhibition are on view again, raising intriguing questions about cultural...

Michelle Grabner

The last time Michelle Grabner had an exhibition at James Cohan Gallery, shortly after she co-curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial, Ken Johnson panned it in the New York Times.

Leo Twiggs

This heartbreaking show consisted of Leo Twiggs’s “Requiem for Mother Emanuel”—a cycle of nine small paintings responding to one of the most horrific racially motivated hate crimes in the United States in decades. 

Feminism, Live: Debate as Theater

What might feminism's present learn from feminism's past? This question is especially urgent after the terrifying first weeks of Trump's presidency. Some answers may be gleaned from The Town Hall Affair, the Wooster Group's new theatrical production...

Critical Eye: Mimi Gross in Her World

In a vast trove of drawings, New York artist Mimi Gross has reflected over the past forty years on her immersion—as a painter, set-and-costume designer, photographer, and filmmaker—in bohemian milieus both here and abroad.

Clifford Owens

In his second solo exhibition at Invisible-Exports, “Hard & Fast,” Clifford Owens shared the stage with a host of contemporary artists, showcasing performances, paintings, and sculptures by others that he responded to in various ways.

Leslie Hewitt

On view in Leslie Hewitt’s recent exhibition at SculptureCenter, an untitled 2012 installation consists of white metal sheets that have been dog-eared or otherwise folded. The sheet-metal sculptures—some standing upright, some laid on the ground with...

Lee Kit

"Who sees me naked, and who spends time alone with me in the bathroom? Johnson & Johnson. Nivea.” This is how Lee Kit, Hong Kong’s representative at the 2013 Venice Biennale, discusses the personal hygiene product logos in the paintings that...

Election 2016: The Spin Zone

A.i.A. responds to the US presidential showdown with a satiric essay by artist and writer Walter Robinson and political cartoons by seven art-world stalwarts: Ida Applebroog, Rashid Johnson, Peter Saul, Jim Shaw, Nayland Blake, and Antoni Muntadas and...

Forms of Address: Ray Johnson’s Bob Boxes

For legendary mail and collage artist Ray Johnson (1927–1995), any ephemera of everyday material culture he encountered could potentially be art—including the bottle caps, abandoned toys, tennis balls, fragments of fractured ceramics, stickers,...

Jessi Reaves

For this debut solo exhibition, Oregon-born, New York–based artist Jessi Reaves demonstrated her omnivorous approach to making sculptural furniture, offering viewers an assortment of pieces that incorporate materials ranging from plywood to car parts...

Rodney McMillian

When I first read Ernest J. Gaines’s novel A Lesson Before Dying (1993), which is set in 1940s Cajun country, I held out hope that Grant Wiggins, the schoolteacher protagonist, would somehow free Jefferson, the young black man falsely accused of...

“The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment”

From the 1969 police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York to the shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, violent attacks have often been inflicted on the LGBTQ community. Curators at the Leslie-Lohman Museum have organized “The 1970s: The Blossoming...

Chosen Family: Gerard & Kelly at the Glass House

“The family is a system of regeneration,” chanted a group of dancers, huddled on the lawn next to Philip Johnson’s modernist Glass House, toward the end of Gerard & Kelly's Modern Living. Performed last weekend on the grounds of Johnson’s estate in...

John Outterbridge

Octogenarian John Outterbridge, who had a distinguished career in arts administration at the Pasadena Art Museum (now the Norton Simon Museum) and the Watts Towers Arts Center, is best known for his poignant assemblages that meld reminders of American...

Evan Holloway

It is possible to argue—and, indeed, I heard it argued while visiting this exhibition—that Evan Holloway belongs to the first generation of artists in Los Angeles that did not look outside of California, to New York or to Europe, to define their work,...

Putting Mapplethorpe in his Place

Twenty-six years ago, Robert Mapplethorpe’s BDSM photographs were successfully defended in court as elegantly rigorous artworks that transcend their maverick origins. But did that normalizing rationale sacrifice more personal and artistic liberty than...

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