Art In America

Jennifer Wynne Reeves

Paint gets physical in the late Jennifer Wynne Reeves's work: bulked up into dented little bricks, squeezed into coils and cones, and knifed, fingered and smeared onto a variety of surfaces that include wood, Masonite and paper (but not canvas), it is...

Chris Martin

In his first exhibition with Anton Kern, Chris Martin shows large mixed-medium abstract paintings that nearly jump off the wall, many of them loaded with holographic glitter custom-designed for Vegas showgirls. Despite such lowbrow associations,...

Paint by Numbers: Suzanne McClelland

In a spate of exhibitions featuring recent paintings, photographs and videos, Suzanne McClelland explores the power of numbers as a motif.

High Style, Clear Form, Sharp Edge

Embracing myriad forms of experimental art and criticism in the 1970s and ’80s, Scott Burton brought a precise yet idiosyncratic intelligence to every project he undertook.

Materializing Six Years

This exhibition's long title, like much of its content, is a little cryptic. "Six Years" is shorthand for a landmark book that critic and curator Lucy Lippard assembled to track the development of idea-based art between 1966 and 1972. Even knowing...

Paul Pfeiffer

As is often true with Paul Pfeiffer, the centerpiece of his recent exhibition was a work that focused on a person who wasn’t there. Playroom (all works 2012) is a scaled-down model of a room based on one in the 1970s mansion of basketball legend Wilt...

Ellen Phelan

At street level of Gasser & Grunert’s two-story gallery, Ellen Phelan’s career-spanning show “Encyclopedia of Drawing, 1964-2012” proceeded at a fairly measured pace, with a few dozen smallish abstractions.

Richard Avedon

The four colossal black-and-white group portraits that Richard Avedon made between 1969 and 1971—most roughly 10 by 30 feet—created, in a recent show at Gagosian, a cruciform galaxy featuring the U.S. military, its antiwar opponents, Pop artists and...

Sue Scott and Meulensteen Galleries Will Shutter

Two New York galleries—Sue Scott Gallery on the Lower East Side and Meulensteen Gallery in Chelsea—will close later this summer. Yesterday, Sue Scott Gallery at 1 Rivington Street announced that the current shows, "Eli Gabriel Halpern:  Do It...

Peter Fend

Peter Fend is not an easy artist to love, for him a point of pride that has become a theme. The dozen documentary works on paper in his recent show mix rage against the machine—governments of major countries and the institutions that serve them (or...

Mary Miss

MARY MISS HAS been making art in, and about, the environment since the late 1960s. More specifically, she treats the surface of the landscape as a permeable skin, and pays particular attention to places where the solid parts of the planet meet the...

Charles Simonds

Forty years ago, Charles Simonds began building, in crumbling corners of downtown Manhattan, tiny brick dwellings meant to house a mythical race of “Little People.” The scratchy, jumpy videos that document these efforts now themselves seem reports...

Clifford Owens

One lesson gleaned from Clifford Owens’s “Anthology” is that submitting to other people’s instructions doesn’t rule out first-person provocation. For this project, Owens solicited performance scores from a multigenerational and interdisciplinary range...

Robert Kinmont

A few of Robert Kinmont’s recent works in this exhibition were fairly big, although even these are equivocal about materiality. Log Hollowed Out and Filled with the Memory of the Artist (2009) is the shell of an upright tree trunk stripped of its bark...

Josephine Halvorson

In Josephine Halvorson's resolutely airless and mute new paintings, everything happens right on the surface. Like classic trompe d'oeil masters, Halvorson comes in close to objects whose raised features or appended materials seem to extend beyond...

Lisa Yuskavage

Rosy and ripe, the pneumatic breasts and butts of Lisa Yuskavage's female subjects continue to expand. Likewise, the manner in which they're painted—tickled and licked, brushed lightly and gently smeared—grows ever more teasingly intimate.

Sanford Biggers

"Sweet Funk-An Introspective," the Brooklyn Museum's sampling of 10 years of Sanford Biggers's work (on view through Jan. 8), centers on the museum's recently acquired Blossom (2007). Shown to advantage in a skylighted, domed gallery, it features a...

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