Art In America

Suellen Rocca

The recent proliferation of smart, funny, cartoony paintings by younger artists in New York has coincided with the rediscovery, through a spate of museum and gallery shows, of work by artists who made smart, funny, cartoony work half a century ago,...

Katharina Wulff

There is an interesting discrepancy between theme and delivery in Katharina Wulff’s new paintings. While the gyms and hotel lobby that serve as their settings imply a certain amount of activity, Wulff renders her scenes relatively static. No real...

Yvonne Jacquette

Yvonne Jacquette has literally taken to the skies to capture the dense aerial landscapes depicted in the thirty-one paintings included in this survey of the last thirty-five years of her career. Jacquette, who divides her time between New York and...

Jim Hodges

The twisting, florid shapes that Jim Hodges has cut into panels of mirrored glass for his installation I dreamed a world and called it Love (2016) recall the blooming vines of Art Nouveau ornament, but the lines are too hard and angular to suggest a...

Renée Green

In Renée Green’s recent exhibition at Nagel Draxler, a row of twenty-eight small fabric banners hung across two walls facing the gallery’s storefront windows, displaying a mix of bold and dissonant colors—hot reds and yellows broken up by cooler...

Kai Althoff

It is easy for the visitor to Kai Althoff’s retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art,  “and then leave me to the common swifts,” to grow irritated: the long wait for entry into the overcrowded galleries, the admonishment from the well-meaning museum...

Causes and Effects: Decolonize This Place at Artists Space

This fall, MTL+ has transformed Artists Space Books & Talk into a vehicle for putting their strategy into practice within the context of larger movements. The residency’s title, Decolonize This Place, comes from a demonstration of the same name that...

Lillian Schwartz

Human-size mainframe computers and magnetic tape storage units, a clunky light pen, cathode-ray tube monitors, film reels: these were the tools that Lillian Schwartz used to make experimental films and graphics at Bell Laboratories in the 1970s. In...

No Going Back: Matt Mullican at Peter Freeman and the Kitchen

Since the 1970s, Mullican has been constructing an individual language to investigate modes of representation and communication. An exhibition at Peter Freeman, Inc. and two recent performances at The Kitchen rehashed many of the tropes and games that...

Lynda Benglis

Speaking with a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1989, Lynda Benglis expressed her disdain for a Puritan strain of society that, as she put it, “gets nervous if things are too pleasurable, too beautiful, or too open.” Feminist art’s most significant...

Pamela Rosenkranz

Anyone can make gestural paintings and installations of green and blue lights, but only Pamela Rosenkranz’s unsettling environments would refer to a substance as specific and obscure as the green blood found in certain species of worms living in the...

Julia Rommel

Julia Rommel’s first solo exhibition at Bureau, in 2012, featured diminutive monochromes perfectly scaled to the gallery’s shoebox space. Bureau has since moved to more expansive digs, and Rommel’s paintings have grown larger, their palettes more...

“Black Pulp!”

The desire to self-present is often a political one, a reaction against others’ feckless stereotypes. In “Black Pulp!,” curators William Villalongo and Mark Thomas Gibson, both artists, have assembled a remarkable collection of printed matter—much on...

Tony Feher

Tony Feher died earlier this year, so “It Didn’t Turn Out the Way I Expected” is not only a debut of a new body of work but also a memorial. It feels restrained in comparison to his retrospective exhibition, which first opened in Des Moines in 2012...

Suburban Futurism

Arguing that urban sprawl is the dominant growth paradigm of the present and future, the author advocates a close examination of dynamic, amorphous metroplexes like Phoenix and Dubai.

São Paulo Bienal

Curated by Jochen Volz with Gabi Ngcobo, Júlia Rebouças, Lars Bang Larsen, and Sofia Olascoaga, the thirty-second edition of the São Paulo Bienal is called “Incerteza Viva.” The English translation of the title is “Live Uncertainty,” which evokes an...

Up Close: Buildings Seeking Art

Real estate developer John Portman's model of integrating art into self-contained architectural spaces affects even edgy galleries and funky nonprofits in Atlanta, where artists are often invited to spearhead gentrification.  

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