Art In America

The Institution as User: Museums on Social Media

On Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram, the museum becomes one of many users, just like the individuals who visit it. Taking advantage of the communication opportunities offered by social media requires accepting a diminishment in status-but this, too,...

Hyon Gyon

Hyon Gyon’s show “She’s A Riot,” occupying both the main gallery and a project space around the corner, violates every stereotype of contemporary Korean art. Rigid formalism, overly refined facture, pervading calm, implicit spirituality—all these are...

Liz Glynn

Auguste Rodin willed the contents of his studio, including the right to cast his sculptures posthumously, to the French state, which has established precise guidelines for how these works should be produced and distributed to cultural institutions...

Pierre Chareau

French designer and architect Pierre Chareau died in 1950, broke and underrated in New York. His work makes a comeback in a remarkable show at the Jewish Museum that effectively harnesses technology to re-create the experience of being in his spaces....

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy

The eerie prescience of Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s recent show at Postmasters was brought home in the wake of the presidential election, as protesters converged night after night in front of New York’s Trump Tower.

Karin Schneider

For her first exhibition at Dominique Lévy, “Situational Diagram,” Karin Schneider filled both floors of the gallery’s Upper East Side town house with variations on the theme of the black monochrome. For these works (all 2016), Schneider employed a...

First Look: Walter K. Scott

Walter K. Scott skewers the art world—especially young artists' often self-destructive pursuit of success—through the comic-strip misadventures of his alter ego, Wendy.

Before Realism

In the seventeenth century, French painters Valentin de Boulogne and the Brothers Le Nain used lessons drawn from Caravaggio to initiate a closer observation of everyday scenes and characters. 

Zao Wou-Ki

Chinese-born painter Zao Wou-Ki (1920–2013) had a long and successful career. But his story presents a classic example of an artist who established an international reputation early on but over time came to be taken for granted, if not nearly...

Dannielle Tegeder

It’s tricky to talk about the installation of Dannielle Tegeder’s exhibition, because it changes every week. Artist Peter Halley and critic Barry Schwabsky have both done rehangings of the show, and surprises continue through the final weekend....

Heide Hatry

Tapping one of the oldest and most basic artistic impulses, the twenty or so works in Heide Hatry’s “Icons in Ash: Cremation Portraits” commemorate deceased individuals in a fashion that is in some ways orthodox, in others conceptually striking....

Rita Ackermann

Rita Ackermann has filled the ground floor of Hauser & Wirth’s temporary Chelsea space with graphically and chromatically strong paintings that confront the machismo of action painters like Franz Kline with a notion of feminine sensuality. Many of the...

Cecily Brown

The title of Cecily Brown’s exhibition at the Drawing Center, “Rehearsal,” was intended to reflect the meaning of the Old French version of the term. Rehercier, a wall text instructed, meant “to go over something again with the aim of more fully...

Overview: Immerse Yourself

Only a handful of movie theaters around the country are equipped to screen Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walkas acclaimed director Ang Lee intended it to be seen. Centering on an Iraq War hero’s ambivalence about participating in a souped-up patriotic...

Labor Relations

For some forty years, Mierle Laderman Ukeles has striven—through artworks, performances, and manifestos—to bring greater recognition to women's domestic labor and the underappreciated services of New York City's Sanitation workers. Yet even she, the...

Slavs and Tatars

Founded in 2006, Slavs and Tatars is an international collective whose eclectic work focuses on the vast, multiethnic portion of Eurasia that lies, according to the artists, “east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China.”

Up Close 2016: Detroit

In 2016 we launched the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Art in America Arts Writing Fellowships, a joint project designed to foster art and culture writing in cities throughout the US. For our September issue, fellowship recipient Lynn Crawford wrote...

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