Art In America

Overview: Between the High and the Low

Overview is a new review column in which writers survey multiple exhibitions or other projects. This month’s edition covers the shows “International Pop,” at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; “Revolution of the Eye,” at the Jewish Museum, New York;...

Going Underground: An Interview with Simone Leigh

Simone Leigh's Free People's Medical Clinic (FPMC) was originally a community-based art commission for "Funk, God, Jazz and Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn," a collaboration between Creative Time and the Weeksville Heritage Center. Here, the artist...

The Agenda: This Week in New York

A.i.A. editors suggest a few of the myriad events taking place in New York this week: a screening of short films about women and race; three performances interrogating masculine mythologies; Agathe Snow's 24-hour film documenting post-September 11...

Kate Manheim

Kate Manheim, whose legendary stage performances epitomized the explosive creativity and often rancorous aesthetic experimentation of New York's downtown scene of the 1970s and '80s, has also created a moving body of work as a visual artist. Her...

Michael Smith

For many performance artists, the reality of getting older necessitates a shift in their practice. This is not the case with Michael Smith. In fact, his work improves with age. His classic characters—the slightly square "everyman" Mike and the...

Susan Cianciolo

The kit—an entity both functional and performative—forms the basis of Susan Cianciolo's exhibition at Bridget Donahue, "if God COMes to visit You, HOW will you know? (the great tetrahedral kite)." Situated on quilts in neat rows, the cardboard kits...

Pieter Schoolwerth

Pieter Schoolwerth is known for reworking old-master paintings to create nearly abstract compositions. 

Sharjah Biennial

Feeling out of place, I found myself marching through the streets of Sharjah with hundreds of others—artists, curators, critics and students—who had come for the opening weekend of the ambitious biennial in this tiny emirate bordering Dubai.

Your Art Fair Antidote: The Guerrilla Girls Turn 30

This month, the Guerrilla Girls turn 30. The masked feminist avengers celebrate their birthday with new campaigns, street actions and an exhibition through May 17 at Abrons Arts Center on the Lower East Side, where they will host a party tonight.

The Breuer Effect

In 1966, A.i.A. devoted four articles in its September-October issue to the then-new Whitney Museum designed by Marcel Breuer. Architectural historian Timothy M. Rohan discusses the views of our writers, who characterized the massive building as a...

Devin Troy Strother

Are African-American fine artists today free from pressures to perform in specifically (but “acceptably”) “black” ways, as determined by a mostly white audience? According to the critique implicit in Devin Troy Strother’s impressive exhibition of new...

Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik has been described as the "father of video art," but the medium-specific moniker obscures his broader fascination with how technologies alter our bodies and our perceptions.

Reading and Rumor: The Problem with Kenneth Goldsmith

At Interrupt 3, a conference on poetry and digital media at Brown University in Providence, Kenneth Goldsmith read the autopsy of Michael Brown, the teenager who was murdered by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., in August 2014.

Walking the Armory with Christopher Y. Lew

At the VIP reception of this year's Armory Show fair (Mar. 5-8), I met up with Christopher Y. Lew, the Whitney Museum of American Art's recently appointed associate curator, who was already stalking the aisles. Lew, who is in his early 30s, came to...

The Agenda: This Week in New York

A.i.A. editors suggest a few of the myriad events taking place in New York this weekend: a screening of Larry Clark’s latest flick at Lincoln Center; a NYPAC-hosted performance by Cecilia Corrigan at the Duplex; Henry Chalfant’s Flyin’ Cut Sleeves at...

From the A.i.A. Archives: Japan’s Gutai Group

Where does play end and art begin? The interest in such questions, largely fostered by the 2013 exhibition “Gutai: Splendid Playground” at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, has now prompted a resurgent fascination with the work of this high-energy...

Inventing Pop Abstraction

Uniting firmly outlined forms and bold colors, American painter Nicholas Krushenick created a new nonobjective vocabulary in the 1960s.    

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