Art In America

No Going Back: Matt Mullican at Peter Freeman and the Kitchen

Since the 1970s, Mullican has been constructing an individual language to investigate modes of representation and communication. An exhibition at Peter Freeman, Inc. and two recent performances at The Kitchen rehashed many of the tropes and games that...

Julia Rommel

Julia Rommel’s first solo exhibition at Bureau, in 2012, featured diminutive monochromes perfectly scaled to the gallery’s shoebox space. Bureau has since moved to more expansive digs, and Rommel’s paintings have grown larger, their palettes more...

“Black Pulp!”

The desire to self-present is often a political one, a reaction against others’ feckless stereotypes. In “Black Pulp!,” curators William Villalongo and Mark Thomas Gibson, both artists, have assembled a remarkable collection of printed matter—much on...

Everything Is About To Begin

Visiting the US in 1966 and 1969, Italy’s controversial postwar Renaissance man, Pier Paolo Pasolini, found a rejuvenating energy in his encounters with fellow filmmakers, artists, writers, and activists.

Ronald Lockett

The assemblage paintings and sculptural objects of Ronald Lockett (1965–1998) often depict animals or figures, constructed of found tin and wood, nails, paint, and sealing compound. With titles like Civil Rights MarchersHiroshimaVerge of...

Cosima von Bonin

A key figure in the irreverent, boisterous Cologne scene of the 1980s, Cosima von Bonin produces eccentric sculptures and installations that evoke a “mad romp through the margins of popular culture,” as Faye Hirsch recently wrote in A.i.A. The focus...

James Hoff

James Hoff uses the conventions of painting to register the circulation of digital images and information. This solo exhibition features works from his “Useless Landscapes” series (2016). Hoff took pictures of forests with a cellphone camera and then...

The Future is Behind Us: The Work of Jaret Vadera

Interdisciplinary artist Jaret Vadera often juxtaposes the way individuals imagine themselves against the way others imagine them. For Vadera, the reality of identity is not static. It cannot be reduced to a political equation or an...

William Eggleston

Over the summer David Zwirner made waves by luring William Eggleston—one of the first photographers to show color prints at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and a pioneer of the medium—away from Gagosian. A few months later, Zwirner has filled the...

Alan Sonfist

One of the most significant works of public art in New York is easy to miss. Alan Sonfist’s Time Landscape, on the corner of Houston Street and LaGuardia Place, is an unassuming patch of precolonial, pre-urbanized ground—a slice of native forest...

Pentti Monkkonen

Before there were art schools and galleries in Los Angeles, there were murals. The tradition has a long and distinguished history, dating from the city’s eighteenth-century Hispanic founders, and it continues to thrive and evolve. LA-based artist...

“Douglas Crimp—Before Pictures New York City 1967–1977”

The history of art in New York during the consequential decade of 1967 to 1977 could be (and has been) narrated in myriad ways, but there’s something especially moving about seeing it represented through a biographical lens in the intimate confines of...

Matthew Barney

I mistakenly expected this partial re-staging of Matthew Barney’s 1991 New York solo debut to have a scrappy and searching look. Instead, the sculptures, installations, and drawings that Barney produced at the age of twenty-four feel fully resolved....

“The Equilibrists”

Organized by New York’s New Museum and Athens’s DESTE Foundation in collaboration with the Benaki Museum, the show features some thirty artists who started their careers during a period of crisis. Caught between the threat of Grexit and the reality of...

The Digitized Museum

Introducing A.i.A.’s special issue on museums and digital technology, its organizers reflect on how new electronic devices, new institutional policies and programs, and a new emphasis on access, interactivity, and feedback are altering...

Ajay Kurian

A giant bust of a muscular cartoon monkey with a spinning mechanical head, its face locked in an expression of joy so hyperbolic that it borders on menace, confronts visitors in the entryway to Ajay Kurian’s “The Dreamers.” Kurian’s sculptures are...

Fiction and Artifice: DIS on YouTube

New York-based collective DIS has pioneered the post-internet aesthetic on their online publishing platform, DIS Magazine. For an overview of DIS’s creative practice and community of collaborators, we have assembled a playlist of videos on our YouTube...

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