Art In America

Local Largesse: Collected in San Francisco

Over the weekend, Bay Area residents got a first look inside a $305-million addition to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA). The new ten-story building, clad with a rippling, glacier-like facade and designed by the Norwegian firm Snøhetta,...

Writing on the Wall: William Kentridge in Rome

Rome has been waiting for contemporary works of public art that can stand up to the historic city’s glorious monuments from the Renaissance and antiquity. Where the architects Richard Meier and Zaha Hadid tried, and failed in the opinion of many,...

Felix Gonzalez-Torres

It’s hard to overstate Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s influence on art since the 1990s. His extraordinary body of work—emotive, delicate, powerful—simultaneously revived and transformed the legacy of Conceptual art. Julie Ault and Roni Horn, two artists who...

“Fade In: Int. Art Gallery—Day”

The paintings and sculptures created for cinematic worlds are elements of set decoration rather than masterpieces. Yet they are nonetheless tasked with playing the role of Art and communicating nuanced ideas about class, taste, and refinement....

Post-Consumer Report: A Conversation with Rodney McMillian

Rodney McMillian’s work is a journey, and viewers willing to travel can make seeing it a journey, too. Three exhibitions on view at East Coast institutions comprise a tripartite midcareer retrospective for the Los Angeles-based artist. The Studio...

Marcel Dzama and Raymond Pettibon

Collaboration is typical in film, music, design and other mass cultural forms, but less common (or less recognized) in the fine arts. High regard for the singular author’s hand is so ingrained that visitors to this exhibition of collaborative drawings...

Hedonists and Humanists: Mapplethorpe in Los Angeles

It seems difficult to reevaluate Robert Mapplethorpe’s career today, partly because the furor over the cancellation of his first retrospective at the Corcoran Gallery in 1989 inspired such thoughtful assessments of his work then. No one will ever sum...

Michael E. Smith

Michael E. Smith’s sculptures convey a contemporary American gothic sensibility, conjuring a world of woodsheds and Walmarts and long winters when the mind can wander. His economical use of materials is matched by the deadpan descriptions of them on...

Stan Douglas

Set in Lisbon during the 1974 Carnation Revolution, which ended Portugal’s dictatorship and its colonial ambitions, Stan Douglas’s The Secret Agent is a faithful update of Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel about the machinations of terrorists and their...

This Land Is Your Land: Earthworks on YouTube

As A.i.A. senior editor William S. Smith pointed out in his essay on Michael Heizer (whose 1970 installation Actual Size: Munich Rotary is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through April 10) our April issue, “Land art was photogenic out of...

One to One

At New York’s Whitney Museum, a full-scale 1970 photographic projection by Michael Heizer brings home the immersiveness, the being-there (even if only vicariously), that is essential to the Land art aesthetic.

Haris Epaminonda

Hanging near the entrance of Haris Epaminoda’s elegant solo show “Vol. XVII” is a framed page of text—apparently excised from a catalogue of Korean painting—that could be considered a substitute for the conventional gallery press release. The concise...

Generation X: Catherine Opie on Robert Mapplethorpe

Last November, FotoFocus organized a conference at the CAC to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the exhibition and to celebrate members of the city's art community who stood up for Mapplethorpe's work. A high point of the conference was artist...

Burn Book: On Fire by Jonathan Griffin

Ross Simonini reviews Jonathan Griffin's recent publication On Fire. Fires are real, not just mythological, and this brief, frank document about fires in artists’ studios suggests not the slightest hint of transcendent meaning behind such disasters....

Speaking Out in Sharjah: A Report from the March Meeting

Since its inception in 2008, the Sharjah Art Foundation’s annual March Meeting has grown to become a city-wide multidisciplinary event. The 2016 edition was organized around the rubric of “Education, Engagement and Participation” and included a...

Cynthia Daignault

Inspired by American travelogues of the past—and realizing that the canon consisted solely of works by men—Cynthia Daignault set out in 2014 to travel the United States for a year by car. She followed a back-roads route around the perimeter of the...

The Pleasures of Being Watched: Neïl Beloufa’s “The Colonies”

In addition to producing videos that blend utopian and dystopian modes of speculation, Neïl Beloufa also establishes, through architectonic structures, specific conditions for viewing those videos—and for being viewed in turn. In “The Colonies,” on...

Björn Braun

“Nothing is ever wasted, only repurposed.” That’s how the press release for Björn Braun’s exhibition “New Towns” describes the Berlin-based artist’s process. It’s a policy that any Boy Scout could admire. Among the things Braun repurposed for the show...

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