Art In America

Sascha Braunig

The wireframe bodies in Sascha Braunig’s latest paintings can be as sinuous as string figures or as rigid as metal grills. They inhabit illusionistic spaces defined by the deceptively simple gradients or environments warped by bold, Op-Art patterns....

Harvey Quaytman

Harvey Quaytman's paintings of the 1980s and '90s, a tight selection of which are on view here, bring the visual rhetoric associated with transcendent abstraction down to earth. Quaytman (1937–2002) is known for works from the 1960s and '70s that...

Tal R

Tal R’s work fits into a subgenre of contemporary painting that could be defined by its stylized figuration featuring saturated or high-key color and conceptually adroit subject matter laden with autobiographical references and surreal imagery.

Vija Celmins

To walk into Vija Celmins’s solo exhibition, her first in seven years, is to enter a world in gray. Detailed paintings of choppy seas and night skies thick with stars—her major subjects since the 1980s—feel immersive even at relatively modest scales...

Urban Pastorals

Sited on Staten Island, Governors Island, and the Brooklyn waterfront, three enormous new parks—reflecting the distinct versions of three top international landscape design firms—provide New York with a host of additional "green" amenities.

Mary Beth Edelson

Patriarchal Piss (1973), on view as part of Mary Beth Edelson’s solo show “The Devil Giving Birth to the Patriarchy,” is a hand-painted photograph of the artist standing nude on a sand dune in North Carolina. Severed (male) heads hang from her biceps,...

Diego Perrone

Glass is a material long associated with illumination, enlightenment, and the divine. The cast glass sculptures featured in Italian artist Diego Perrone’s exhibition “Self Portraits” hold out the promise of personal revelation. Elegantly displayed on...

Clifford Owens

In his second solo exhibition at Invisible-Exports, “Hard & Fast,” Clifford Owens shared the stage with a host of contemporary artists, showcasing performances, paintings, and sculptures by others that he responded to in various ways.

Group Exhibition

Murray Guy, a Chelsea art gallery that is closing after an eighteen-year run next month, offered an education in challenging art. The program skewed toward conceptually driven photography and film; the gallery was often filled with the sound of a 16mm...

Liz Glynn

Auguste Rodin willed the contents of his studio, including the right to cast his sculptures posthumously, to the French state, which has established precise guidelines for how these works should be produced and distributed to cultural institutions...

Overview: Immerse Yourself

Only a handful of movie theaters around the country are equipped to screen Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walkas acclaimed director Ang Lee intended it to be seen. Centering on an Iraq War hero’s ambivalence about participating in a souped-up patriotic...

“Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America”

“Secure the shadow ere the substance fades,” one of the earliest slogans used by commercial photographers, refers to the light-catching nature of the medium but also to the Victorian-era practice of depicting corpses in lifelike poses. “Securing the...

Anthony Caro

There’s always more to discover in Antony Caro’s sculptures, miraculously refined compositions of sometimes scrappy industrial materials. A seminal British modernist, Caro (1924–2013) extended an aesthetic tradition pioneered by Picasso and David...

Kai Althoff

It is easy for the visitor to Kai Althoff’s retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art,  “and then leave me to the common swifts,” to grow irritated: the long wait for entry into the overcrowded galleries, the admonishment from the well-meaning museum...

No Going Back: Matt Mullican at Peter Freeman and the Kitchen

Since the 1970s, Mullican has been constructing an individual language to investigate modes of representation and communication. An exhibition at Peter Freeman, Inc. and two recent performances at The Kitchen rehashed many of the tropes and games that...

Julia Rommel

Julia Rommel’s first solo exhibition at Bureau, in 2012, featured diminutive monochromes perfectly scaled to the gallery’s shoebox space. Bureau has since moved to more expansive digs, and Rommel’s paintings have grown larger, their palettes more...

“Black Pulp!”

The desire to self-present is often a political one, a reaction against others’ feckless stereotypes. In “Black Pulp!,” curators William Villalongo and Mark Thomas Gibson, both artists, have assembled a remarkable collection of printed matter—much on...

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