Art In America

Group Exhibition

Murray Guy, a Chelsea art gallery that is closing after a twelve-year run next month, offered an education in challenging art. The program skewed toward conceptually driven photography and film; the gallery was often filled with the sound of a 16mm...

Liz Glynn

Auguste Rodin willed the contents of his studio, including the right to cast his sculptures posthumously, to the French state, which has established precise guidelines for how these works should be produced and distributed to cultural institutions...

Overview: Immerse Yourself

Only a handful of movie theaters around the country are equipped to screen Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walkas acclaimed director Ang Lee intended it to be seen. Centering on an Iraq War hero’s ambivalence about participating in a souped-up patriotic...

“Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America”

“Secure the shadow ere the substance fades,” one of the earliest slogans used by commercial photographers, refers to the light-catching nature of the medium but also to the Victorian-era practice of depicting corpses in lifelike poses. “Securing the...

Anthony Caro

There’s always more to discover in Antony Caro’s sculptures, miraculously refined compositions of sometimes scrappy industrial materials. A seminal British modernist, Caro (1924–2013) extended an aesthetic tradition pioneered by Picasso and David...

Kai Althoff

It is easy for the visitor to Kai Althoff’s retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art,  “and then leave me to the common swifts,” to grow irritated: the long wait for entry into the overcrowded galleries, the admonishment from the well-meaning museum...

No Going Back: Matt Mullican at Peter Freeman and the Kitchen

Since the 1970s, Mullican has been constructing an individual language to investigate modes of representation and communication. An exhibition at Peter Freeman, Inc. and two recent performances at The Kitchen rehashed many of the tropes and games that...

Julia Rommel

Julia Rommel’s first solo exhibition at Bureau, in 2012, featured diminutive monochromes perfectly scaled to the gallery’s shoebox space. Bureau has since moved to more expansive digs, and Rommel’s paintings have grown larger, their palettes more...

“Black Pulp!”

The desire to self-present is often a political one, a reaction against others’ feckless stereotypes. In “Black Pulp!,” curators William Villalongo and Mark Thomas Gibson, both artists, have assembled a remarkable collection of printed matter—much on...

Suburban Futurism

Arguing that urban sprawl is the dominant growth paradigm of the present and future, the author advocates a close examination of dynamic, amorphous metroplexes like Phoenix and Dubai.

Everything Is About To Begin

Visiting the US in 1966 and 1969, Italy’s controversial postwar Renaissance man, Pier Paolo Pasolini, found a rejuvenating energy in his encounters with fellow filmmakers, artists, writers, and activists.

Ronald Lockett

The assemblage paintings and sculptural objects of Ronald Lockett (1965–1998) often depict animals or figures, constructed of found tin and wood, nails, paint, and sealing compound. With titles like Civil Rights MarchersHiroshimaVerge of...

Cosima von Bonin

A key figure in the irreverent, boisterous Cologne scene of the 1980s, Cosima von Bonin produces eccentric sculptures and installations that evoke a “mad romp through the margins of popular culture,” as Faye Hirsch recently wrote in A.i.A. The focus...

James Hoff

James Hoff uses the conventions of painting to register the circulation of digital images and information. This solo exhibition features works from his “Useless Landscapes” series (2016). Hoff took pictures of forests with a cellphone camera and then...

The Future is Behind Us: The Work of Jaret Vadera

Interdisciplinary artist Jaret Vadera often juxtaposes the way individuals imagine themselves against the way others imagine them. For Vadera, the reality of identity is not static. It cannot be reduced to a political equation or an...

William Eggleston

Over the summer David Zwirner made waves by luring William Eggleston—one of the first photographers to show color prints at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and a pioneer of the medium—away from Gagosian. A few months later, Zwirner has filled the...

Alan Sonfist

One of the most significant works of public art in New York is easy to miss. Alan Sonfist’s Time Landscape, on the corner of Houston Street and LaGuardia Place, is an unassuming patch of precolonial, pre-urbanized ground—a slice of native forest...

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