Art In America

Corporate Aesthetics: The Yes Men Revolt

There is justice in the world of the Yes Men. A spokesman for Dow Chemical accepted responsibility for the 1984 Bhopal disaster live on the BBC, the New York Times announced that the Iraq war ended in November 2008, and the New York Post editorial...

Corporate Aesthetics: Ingrid Baxter of N.E. Thing Co.

Deep Cove Canoe and Kayak Centre, of North Vancouver, British Columbia is, without a doubt, a real business. During the high season more than 60 employees facilitate aquatic recreation in the spectacular Indian Arm fjord. Deep Cove's founder,...

AICA Announces Best Show Awards for 2013

The U.S. chapter of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA-USA) has announced its annual best show awards. Eighteen winners and runners-up in nine categories are recognized from among more than 140 finalists proposed by AICA-USA's...

Brand Minimalism

The organizer of a quietly daring Chicago exhibition recalls how, decades ago, he suggested an analogy between commercial design and the era's most formally rigorous art.

Outing Darger

Ever since the work of the now legendary Chicago-based outsider artist and writer Henry Darger came to light in 1977, four years after his death at age 81, there has been wild art world speculation about this reclusive person.

Tabor Robak

At the moment, Tabor Robak's 3-D-modeled landscapes and simulated video-game interfaces seem utterly contemporary, especially in contrast to the 16mm film projectors and slide carousels that pass for "new" media in some art-world venues.

Richard Serra

Richard Serra is widely celebrated by academics and popular critics alike for rethinking the very nature of sculptural objects.  

Invisible Ink

"Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China," now at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, seems at first to be a long-awaited corrective to Western myopia in regard to Chinese ink painting and calligraphy.

“The Shadows Took Shape”

John Akomfrah's 1996 documentary The Last Angel of History begins with a man standing in a flooded, sun-filled trailer park narrating the legendary tale of blues musician Robert Johnson's life. Johnson is said to have traded his soul for the spirit of...

Depicting Dislocation

Over the course of four decades, John Divola has photographed haunting traces of residential displacement and social anomie in the Los Angeles region.

Haacke and Shrigley Step Up to London’s Fourth Plinth

Sculptures by Hans Haacke and David Shrigley will be next to grace the Fourth Plinth in London's Trafalgar Square. In early 2015, the northwest corner of the square will welcome Haacke's Gift Horse, with Shrigley's Really Good to follow in...

Isaac Julien

When Sergei Eisenstein set out to make a feature film about Karl Marx's Capital, he envisioned a work of brutal poetry. 

The Maker: William J. O’Brien

Chicago artist William J. O'Brien is in demand. His first major survey exhibition, "William J. O'Brien," opens this weekend at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) in Chicago (Jan. 25-May 18).

Verbatim: Heather Guertin

The first time I thought seriously about the figure of Pierrot was after watching Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise (1945). I had just started doing stand-up comedy in addition to painting, and at that point I was doing a lot of self-reflection...

Chris Burden

While the title of Chris Burden's retrospective, "Extreme Measures," promises thrills and even danger, the exhibition begins in the classroomlike confines of the museum's fifth floor. 

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