Stan Douglas

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Set in Lisbon during the 1974 Carnation Revolution, which ended Portugal’s dictatorship and its colonial ambitions, Stan Douglas’s The Secret Agent is a faithful update of Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel about the machinations of terrorists and their police antagonists in London. Despite Douglas’s creative use of a six-channel installation—characters in dialogue appear on facing screens and certain scenes are depicted from multiple angles—there’s something oddly claustrophobic about the feature-length cinematic work, which resembles at times a PBS period drama. The actors, cast in Portugal, speak with pan-European accents and often with flat affects. Combined with the overall grayness of 1970s Lisbon, the drab dialogue makes the work a rejoinder to the post-punk glamour bestowed on the era’s revolutionary violence in the 2010 television miniseries “Carlos,” or to the fun of a spy-vs.-spy James Bond film. The police and terrorists alike are small, bumbling, and dreary. Like Douglas’s celebrated photographs (a selection of which are concurrently on view at Zwirner’s 20th Street location), The Secret Agent is a tour de force of set and costume design, awash in accurate details. But the tangled narrative of petty conflict serves almost as a bulwark against nostalgia and romance. As might be expected for a motion picture by a renowned photographer, there is a pervading sense of stasis here. “The terrorist and the policeman both come from the same basket,” as the anarchist Professor says in Conrad’s book. “Revolution, legality—counter moves in the same game; forms of idleness at bottom identical.” –William S. Smith

 

Pictured: Still from Stan Douglas’s The Secret Agent, 2015. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York and London.

Stan Douglas

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Stan Douglas’s show “Luanda-Kinshasa” imagines what might have been if Miles Davis had stuck with the experimental strain that marked his commercial flop On the Corner. Douglas’s video shows bandleader Jason Moran and a number of New York musicians playing at a painstakingly crafted re-creation of “The Church,” the famous Columbia Records studio where artists including Davis, Bob Dylan, Pink Floyd and Johnny Cash recorded albums. Stick around for 14 minutes or so and you’ll hear the two tracks the musicians perform, but know that six hours’ worth of material is generated by Douglas’s “recombinant” treatment, which allows different solos to play out over different basic tracks. The music is so good it hurts.